July 2019 Magazine

Arkansas Businesses Celebrating Anniversaries: WD&D – 100 Years

arkansas

by Tristan Bennett

WD&D – 100 Years

This year many Arkansas businesses are celebrating big anniversaries alongside our state’s celebration of its territory bicentennial. Anniversaries are always an accomplishment, whether it’s one year, a centennial or more. 

Bought as part of the Louisiana Purchase, the land that became Arkansas was established as a territory on March 2, 1819, according to the “Encyclopedia of Arkansas.” To celebrate the bicentennial, Arkansans gathered at the State Capitol in March for a party complete with a birthday cake, historical displays and a speech from Gov. Asa Hutchinson.

Several of the state’s businesses are holding their own anniversary celebrations this year. It’s a milestone many do not get to enjoy. Twenty percent of businesses never see their first anniversary, and only about half will make it to their fifth year, according to the Small Business Administration. Arkansas is lucky to have such a diverse economy made up of local, homegrown businesses that Arkansans have continued to support for many years. 

Over the last century, Wittenburg, Delony & Davidson Architects (WD&D) has designed many landmark buildings, such as Little Rock Central High School, the state health buildings, Regions Tower, the Stephens building and the brand new First National Financial Park in Jonesboro.

WD&D has survived through numerous wars, the Great Depression and the 2008 recession. Through it all, the firm just appointed only its sixth CEO since its opening a hundred years ago.

“The firm has been blessed with great clients over the 100 years of business, and we have maintained a very diversified portfolio in the various project types,” says WD&D CEO Chad Young. “The architecture of WD&D is the stage on which so many of our communities are working and living in day to day.” 

Anything from a large corporate headquarters to an elementary school could have the WD&D name on it, meaning that people all over the state are living and working in one of their buildings. 

WD&D works in both the private and public sectors in order to maintain a steady workflow in times of recession.

The firm’s work to improve the community has always been at the forefront of the business. The company also stays involved in several community organizations such as the Downtown Little Rock Partnership, Rotary International and StudioMAIN.

Architecture the world over is ever changing and WD&D works tirelessly to keep up in order to best serve its clients. 

“Flexibility in how we inspire creativity in design that results in a timeless quality in our architecture” is how Young says the company has endured a century of business. 

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